The January 6 corporate accountability index

After a violent mob stormed the Capitol building in January, hundreds of corporations pledged to make changes to their political giving. Some corporations pledged to withhold PAC funding to the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the election, setting the stage for the riot. Other corporations said they were suspending all PAC activity and others promised to reevaluate their giving criteria in light of the violence. 

Popular Information's January 6 corporate accountability index is the first resource that comprehensively monitors these pledges. It tracks which companies have kept their promises, which ones violated their promises directly, and which ones fall somewhere in between.

This index will be regularly updated as new FEC filings become available. 

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Corporations that pledged to end support to the 147 Republican objectors and have kept their promises

After January 6, these companies specifically pledged to cut off support for the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the election on January 6. Since then, these companies have not donated to those Republican members of the House or Senate, leadership PACs controlled by those members, or multi-candidate committees that primarily support those members. There are currently 38 companies in this group.

Airbnb, Allstate, Amazon, American Express, BASF, CBS Corporation, CISCO, Commerce Bancshares, Dell, Dow Inc., Eversource Energy, General Mills, Hallmark Cards, Holland & Hart, Kraft Heinz, Lyft, Marriott, Marsh & McLennan, Massmutual, Mastercard, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Newmont, Nike, NRG Energy, PPL, Public Service Enterprise Group, Qurate Retail, S&P Global, Sony Music Group, State Street, Texas Instruments, Universal Music Group, Vertex, Walgreens, Walt Disney, Warner Music Group, Zillow

Corporations that pledged to suspend all PAC donations and have not donated directly or indirectly to the 147 Republican objectors

After January 6, these companies pledged to suspend all PAC donations. Since then, they have not donated to the 147 Republican objectors, leadership PACs controlled by those members, or multi-candidate committees that primarily support those members. There are currently 48 companies in this group.

3M, AbbVie, Alaska Air Group, Alcoa, Alliance Data Systems, American Family Insurance Group, American International Group, Applied Materials, Bank of America, Blackrock, BP North America, C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Calpine, Capital One, CenterPoint, Cintas, Citigroup, Clorox, CMS Energy, Coca-Cola Company, ConocoPhillips, Deloitte, Dupont, Ecolab, Edison International, Edward Jones, Ernst & Young, Expedia Group, Facebook, Farmers Insurance Exchange, FirstEnergy, Goldman Sachs, Hilton Worldwide, Intuit, JBS USA, McDonalds, Micron Technology, Mutual of Omaha Insurance, Nationwide, Prudential Financial, Republic Services, Safeway, Sprint, Squire Patton Boggs, Target, Travelers, WEC Energy Group, Whirlpool

Corporations that pledged to suspend donations to the 147 Republican objectors but directly donated to those Republicans

This category includes companies that pledged specifically to cut off donations to the 147 Republicans after January 6 and have since donated directly to those Republicans. There is currently four companies in this group. 

What Cigna said after January 6: "All of our PAC contributions are intended to be constructive, non-partisan and aim to advance public policies that we believe support the greater societal good of a more affordable, predictable and simpler health care system. There is never any justification for violence or the kind of destruction that occurred at the U.S. Capitol last week – a building that stands as a powerful symbol of the very democracy that makes our nation strong. Accordingly, CignaPAC will discontinue support of any elected official who encouraged or supported violence, or otherwise hindered a peaceful transition of power. We will continue to evaluate our PAC contributions aligned to business objectives through the filter of our country’s and company’s core values.”

Cigna donated $30,000 to 15 Republican objectors, $15,000 to the NRSC on February 4 and $15,000 to the NRCC on February 26.

Cigna told the New York Times that donating to members of Congress that voted to overturn the election does not violate its pledge to "discontinue support" to any official who "hindered a peaceful transition of power" because voting is "by definition, part of the peaceful transition of power."

What eBay said after January 6: “eBay’s PAC has made the decision to suspend contributions to members of Congress that voted against the peaceful transfer of power. Additionally, while we were already reviewing the criteria we use to ensure that eBay’s PAC contributions support candidates whose values are in line with those of our company, following last week’s events, we have also decided to pause all political contributions while we undergo this review.”

eBay donated $2,500 to one Republican objector.

Eli Lilly donated $16,000 to eight Republican objectors, $15,000 to the NRCC on 7/05, and $15,000 to the NRSC on 8/09.

What PriceWaterhouseCoopers said after January 6: “The attack on our US Capitol was deeply disturbing and goes against everything we stand for in our democracy. Given this moment in history, the PwC PAC has suspended all political contributions to any member of Congress who voted to object to the certification of electoral votes.”

PriceWaterhouseCoopers donated $49,500 to 17 Republican objectors, $15,000 to the NRSC on 7/07 and $15,000 to the NRCC on both 7/21 and 9/30.

Corporations that pledged to suspend donations to the 147 Republican objectors but violated the spirit of the pledge

These companies specifically pledged to cut off support for the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the election on January 6. Since then, they have not donated directly to those Republican members of the House or Senate but have donated to multi-candidate committees that support those Republicans. This includes committees like the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) which supports the reelection of more than 130 Republican House members who voted to overturn the election. There are currently 15 companies in this group.

After January 6, AT&T said: "Employees on our Federal PAC Board convened a call today and decided to suspend contributions to members of Congress who voted to object to the certification of Electoral College votes this week." AT&T donated $5,000 to the House Conservatives Fund on February 22, $15,000 to the NRSC on August 30, and $15,000 to the NRCC on August 31. The House Conservatives Fund serves as the primary vehicle for the Republican Study Committee (RSC); the overwhelming majority of members of the RSC voted to overturn the election results on January 6.

After January 6, Blue Cross Blue Shield said: "At the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, we continuously evaluate our political contributions to ensure that those we support share our values and goals. In light of this week’s violent, shocking assault on the United States Capitol, and the votes of some members of Congress to subvert the results of November’s election by challenging Electoral College results, BCBSA will suspend contributions to those lawmakers who voted to undermine our democracy. “ Blue Cross Blue Shield donated $15,000 to the NRSC on 9/30.

After January 6, Comcast & NBC Universal said: "[W]e will suspend all of our political contributions to those elected officials who voted against certification of the electoral college votes, which will give us the opportunity to review our political giving policies and practices." Comcast & NBC Universal donated $15,000 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) and $15,000 to the NRCC on 5/18.

After January 6, Cozen O’Connor said : "Cozen O’Connor’s executive chairman and CEO said Tuesday in a statement the firm would halt PAC contributions to those in Congress who objected to the certification of the 2020 Electoral College results."  Cozen O’Connor donated $15,000 to the NRSC on 5/05, $25,000 total to the NRCC on 2/25 and 6/04, and $15,000 to the NRSC on 8/18.

After January 6, Genentech said it would suspend contributions to Republican objectors. Genentech donated $15,000 to the NRCC and $15,000 to the NRSC on June 30.

After January 6, General Electric said: “The GEPAC board has voted to suspend donations to those who voted to oppose the Electoral College results. This is not a decision we made lightly, but is one we believe is important to ensure that our future contributions continue to reflect our company’s values and commitment to democracy.” General Electric donated $15,000 to the NRSC on April 20 and $15,000 to the NRCC on April 23.

After January 6, Google said: “After the disturbing events at the Capitol, NetPAC paused all contributions while undertaking a review. Following that review, the NetPAC board has decided that it will not be making any contributions this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certification of the election results.” Google donated $30,000 total to the NRSC and NRCC on June 30.

After January 6, Home Depot said: “We are pausing to take time to carefully review and reevaluate each of the members who voted to object to the election results before considering further contributions to them. While the PAC is making contribution decisions on the next cycle, as always, it will evaluate future donations against a number of factors. Our PAC supports candidates on both sides of the aisle who champion pro-business, pro-retail positions that create jobs and economic growth.” Home Depot donated $15,000 to the NRSC on March 31.

After January 6, Intel said: The company “will not contribute to members of Congress who voted against certification of the Electoral College vote as we feel that action was counter to our company's values.” Intel donated $15,000 to the NRSC on March 2 and $15,000 to the NRCC on February 26. 

After January 6, KPMG said: “The KPMG PAC is imposing a moratorium on contributions to Members of Congress who supported objections to state certifications of the 2020 presidential election results, during which time we will re-evaluate our approach to PAC giving." KPMG donated $15,000 to the NRSC on June 30. 

After January 6, NextEra said: “Like most Americans, we were extremely disturbed by what we witnessed at the Capitol last week and the events leading up to it, and will take this opportunity to conduct a thorough review of our political contributions and PAC activity. While we conduct our review, we will not be making contributions to lawmakers who voted to contest the outcome of the election.” NextEra donated $60,000 total to the NRSC on April 28 and June 28 and $45,000 to the NRCC on June 23.

After January 6, Oracle said: "Oracle Political Action Committee (OPAC) has decided to pause contributions to anyone who voted against certifying the November 2020 election results." Oracle donated $11,250 total to the NRSC on March 17, June 17, and September 21 and $11,250 total to NRCC on March 17, June 17, and September 24.

After January 6, Sanofi said it would suspend contributions to Republican objectors. Sanofi donated $15,000 to the NRSC on 3/17. 

After January 6, Verizon said: The company will be “suspending contributions in 2021 to any member of Congress who voted in favor of objecting to the election results.” Verizon donated $15,000 to the NRSC on June 3 and $15,000 to the NRCC on June 4.

After January 6, Walmart said: “In light of last week’s attack on the U.S. Capitol, Walmart’s political action committee is indefinitely suspending contributions to those members of Congress who voted against the lawful certification of state electoral college votes." Walmart donated $30,000 to the NRSC on April 20 and $30,000 to the NRCC on April 23.

Corporations that pledged to suspend all PAC donations and then directly donated to the 147 Republican objectors

After January 6, these companies pledged to suspend all PAC donations. Since then, they've donated directly to one or more of the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the election. Some have also donated to multi-candidate committees that primarily support Republican objectors. There are currently 46 companies in this group.

The group's top donors include Boeing ($367,500 to 48 Republican objectors, the NRSC, and the NRCC), Lockheed Martin ($219,500 to 75 Republican objectors, the NRSC, and the NRCC), and GM ($107,500 to 21 Republican objectors and the NRSC).

Abbott Laboratories, Accenture, Aflac, Altria Group, Ameren, American Electric Power, Ameriprise Financial, Archer Daniels Midlands, Baker & Hostetler, Bloomin’ Brands, Boeing, Booz Allen Hamilton, Boston Scientific, Cheniere Energy, Commercial Metals, Davita, Discover Financial Services, Gilead Sciences, GM, Hartford Financial Services Group, Holland & Knight, Jacobs Engineering Group, JetBlue Airways, Kroger, Leidos, Lockheed Martin, Marathon Petroleum Corporation, Metlife, Molson Coors, Northrop Grumman, Novo Nordisk, Occidental Petroleum, PPG Industries, Raytheon, Regions Financial, Spirit Aerosystems, Stanley Black & Decker, T-Mobile, Tysons Food, Union Pacific, UPS, U.S. Bancorp, Valero Energy, Wells Fargo, Westrock, Zimmer Biomet Holdings

Corporations that pledged to suspend all PAC donations and then indirectly donated to the 147 Republican objectors

After January 6, these companies pledged to suspend all PAC donations. Since then, they have not donated directly to any of the 147 Republican objectors, but they have donated to multi-candidate committees, like the NRSC and the NRCC, that support Republican objectors. There are currently 11 companies in this group.

American Airlines, AmerisourceBergen, Baxter International, CME Group, DTE Energy, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Liberty Mutual Insurance, MLB, Smithfield Foods, UnitedHealth, Visa

Corporations that pledged to reevaluate their donation criteria after January 6 and then directly donated to GOP objectors 

After January 6, these companies pledged to reevaluate their PAC donation criteria in light of the violence. Since then, they've donated directly to one or more of the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the election. Some have also donated to multi-candidate committees that primarily support Republican objectors. There are currently 16 companies in this group.

The group's top donor is Toyota, which donated $95,500 total to 54 Republican objectors. In June, however, Toyota announced it would stop contributing to Republican objectors. Other top donors in this group include Chevron ($71,000 to 20 Republican objectors) and Ford donated ($48,000 to eight Republican objectors, the NRSC and the NRCC).

Amgen, Berkshire Hathaway Energy, Chevron, Cox Enterprises, Delta, Duke Energy, Entergy, Exxon Mobil, FedEx, Ford, Laboratory Corp. of America, PG&E, Southern Company, Suntrust, Toyota, Xcel Energy

Corporations that pledged to reevaluate their donation criteria after January 6 and then indirectly donated to the 147 Republican objectors 

After January 6, these companies pledged to reevaluate their PAC donation criteria in light of the violence. Since then, they have not donated directly to any of the 147 Republican objectors but they have donated to multi-candidate committees, like the NRSC and the NRCC, that support Republican objectors. There are currently 5 companies in this group.

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, CVS, Dish Network, PNC, United Airlines

If you believe you have identified an error in this report, please contact rebecca@popular.info. 

This report was last updated on November 8, 2021.