Major corporations say they will stop donating to members of Congress who tried to overturn the election

On January 6, a violent mob stormed the Capitol of the United States, disrupting the joint session to confirm Joe Biden's victory. The incident left five people dead, including a member of the Capitol police who was crushed to death in the melee. 

Now, three major corporations tell Popular Information that they will stop contributing to Republican members of Congress who encouraged the rioters by objecting to the certification of the Electoral College vote.

The mob was summoned and whipped into a frenzy by Trump, who still maintains he won the election and relentlessly pushes baseless allegations of fraud. But none of it would be possible without the complicity of certain Republican members of Congress. January 6 is normally of no particular significance in the process of selecting a president. Congress opens up some envelopes and confirms the winner, who was already determined by the meeting of the Electoral College in December. 

But there were 147 Republican members of Congress, including eight Senators, who objected to the certified results of the Electoral College in one or more states. The participation of these members of Congress convinced millions of people that it was possible that, on January 6, the results of the election could be overturned and Trump could be installed for a second term. This was a lie, but tens of thousands of people showed up in Washington D.C. anyway. 

The objections also forced what would normally be a brief administrative exercise into a lengthy ordeal. An objection to the certification of the vote in Arizona forced the House and the Senate to separate into their respective chambers to "debate" the objections for hours. This provided time needed for the mob to launch their violent attack on the Capitol and disrupt the proceedings. The House and Senate were forced to adjourn and members retreated into secure facilities as the rioters roamed the Capitol, posing for photos. 

Before the riots began, 14 Senators said they planned to join the objections for one or more states. But eight Senators — Tommy Tuberville (R-AL), Rick Scott (R-FL), Roger Marshall (R-KS), John Kennedy (R-LA), Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-MS), Josh Hawley (R-MO), Ted Cruz (R-TX), and Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) — followed through with their objections when the Senate reconvened after order was restored. As the world watched in horror, these Senators carried through with their plans to validate baseless allegations of fraud and undermine the democratic system.

The Kansas City Star said that Hawley had "blood on his hands" and should resign. The Houston Chronicle said Cruz's "lies cost lives" and called for his resignation.

Popular Information contacted 144 corporations that, through their corporate PACs, donated to one or more of these eight Senators in the 2020 election cycle. Popular Information asked if they would continue to support these Senators in the future. In response, three major companies said they would stop donating to any member of Congress who objected to the certification of the Electoral College vote. 

The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association is a federation of companies that provide health insurance for 107 million people in 50 states. The Blue Cross Blue Shield Association PAC, known as BLUEPAC, typically favors Republican candidates. In the last three cycles, the PAC has donated $959,060 to Republican candidates and $359,550 to Democratic candidates.

During the 2020 cycle, BLUEPAC donated to three Senators who objected to the Electoral College vote — $10,000 to Tuberville, $1,000 to Marshall, and $500 to Hawley.

In a statement to Popular Information, Blue Cross Blue Shield Association President and CEO Kim Keck said it was suspending all support to the 147 Republicans who voted "to subvert the results of November’s election by challenging Electoral College results."

At the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, we continuously evaluate our political contributions to ensure that those we support share our values and goals. In light of this week’s violent, shocking assault on the United States Capitol, and the votes of some members of Congress to subvert the results of November’s election by challenging Electoral College results, BCBSA will suspend contributions to those lawmakers who voted to undermine our democracy.

While a contrast of ideas, ideological differences and partisanship are all part of our politics, weakening our political system and eroding public confidence in it must never be. We will continue to support lawmakers and candidates in both political parties who will work with us to build a stronger, healthier nation.

Marriott International operates more than 7000 properties worldwide and, even in the midst of a pandemic, is valued at over $42 billion. Historically, Marriott's PAC has favored Republicans but, beginning in 2010 began evenly splitting contributions roughly evenly between the two parties. 

During the 2020 cycle, Marriott's PAC donated $1000 to Hawley's campaign and another $1,000 to Hawley's leadership PAC.

Marriott told Popular Information that it will stop donating to all the members who voted against certification. "We have taken the destructive events at the Capitol to undermine a legitimate and fair election into consideration and will be pausing political giving from our Political Action Committee to those who voted against certification of the election," a spokesperson said. The company did not indicate when, if ever, it would resume supporting those 147 Republicans. 

Commerce Bancshares is a bank holding company best known for operating Commerce Bank. It currently has an $8 billion market cap and $54 billion under management. Commerce Bancshares PAC favors Republican candidates over Democratic candidates by a six-to-one margin. 

During the 2020 cycle, Commerce Bancshares PAC donated $2,500 to Marshall.

Commerce Bancshares told Popular Information that it has "suspended all support for officials who have impeded the peaceful transfer of power."

Commerce Bank’s employee-funded Political Action Committee (PAC) contributes campaign donations to elected officials of both parties because of their pro-business records and because they are interested in helping to ensure the banking industry can serve both individuals and businesses. At this time, we have suspended all support for officials who have impeded the peaceful transfer of power. Commerce Bank condemns violence in any form and believes the actions witnessed this week are abhorrent, anti-democratic and entirely contrary to supporting goodwill for Americans and businesses.

All three companies appear to allow, to varying degrees, for the possibility of resuming their support of these members sometime in the future. But their commitment to indefinitely suspend contributions to more than half of the Republicans in the House and Senate is significant. 

Dow Inc., the massive chemical company, was more definitive. The company told Popular Information on Monday that it will no longer donate to any member of Congress who objected to the certification to the Electoral College for the duration of their term in office.

Dow is immediately suspending all corporate and employee political action committee (PAC) contributions to any member of Congress who voted to object to the certification of the presidential election. This suspension will remain in place for a period of one election cycle (two years for House members; up to six years for Senators), which specifically includes contributions to the candidate’s reelection committee and their affiliated PACs. Dow is committed to the principles of democracy and the peaceful transfer of power. Our values – integrity, respect for people, and protecting our planet – are the foundation on which we stand and our values guide our political contributions.

Dow Inc. donated $2,000 to Kennedy during the 2020 cycle.

Citibank announced Sunday evening that it will “not support candidates who do not respect the rule of law” and will pause all PAC activity for three months, according to an internal memo obtained by Popular Information. Citibank had previously donated $1,000 to Hawley.

On Monday, Mastercard stated that it was suspending donations “to members of Congress who voted to object to the certification of the 2020 election,” according to an internal announcement obtained by Popular Information.

Simple decency and sober reflection require us to account for the events in Washington this past week -- not just the lawless violence, but also elected United States representatives seeking to subvert the decision of the people in the recent Presidential election. In our political system, nothing is more important than the smooth transition of power when voters have spoken. Accordingly, effective immediately, we have suspended Political Action Committee giving to member of Congress (House of Representatives and Senate) who voted to object to the certification of the 2020 Presidential election. We will continue to review the criteria that inform our political contributions to ensure they reflect our values. We remain hopeful about the future, one in which people of differences come together to add our common challenges.

Mastercard’s PAC donated $1,000 to Hawley.

Similarly, AT&T, the largest corporate contributor to the Republicans who objected to the election results, announced that it will suspend donations to lawmakers who participated. Previously, AT&T told Popular Information that it would "weigh candidates’ positions, votes cast and actions taken when making decisions about future PAC support." But on Monday the company told Popular Information that it will "suspend contributions to members of Congress who voted to object to the certification of Electoral College votes last week.” AT&T’s PAC donated $33,000 to five Senators — $15,000 to Cruz, $10,000 to Marshall, $4,000 to Kennedy, $2,000 to Hawley, and $2,000 to Scott. 

Deloitte announced that it will suspend political contributions and “will not support those who undermine the rule of law,” according to an email to staff obtained by Popular Information. Deloitte’s PAC donated $10,000 to Marshall and $10,000 to Hawley.

Morgan Stanley is suspending contributions to lawmakers who objected to certifying the election results, reports Bloomberg. Morgan Stanley’s PAC donated $4,500 to Marshall.

ViacomCBS announced it will no longer donate to members of Congress who voted against the certification, according to an internal memo obtained by Popular Information. The CBS Corporation PAC donated $1,000 to Scott in 2019.

Pfizer said it will not donate "to any of the 147 Members of Congress who voted against certifying the Electoral College results" for at least 6 months, according to an internal memo obtained by Popular Information. Pfizer’s PAC donated $6,500 to Marshall, $5,000 to Lummis, and $2,500 to Kennedy.

Airbnb issued a statement that its PAC “will update its framework and withhold support from those who voted against the certification of the presidential election results.” Airbnb’s PAC donated $2200 to Scott.

Amazon, which donated over $600,000 to the group of Republicans who voted to overturn the election results, also told Popular Information that it “has suspended contributions to any member of Congress who voted to override the results of the U.S. presidential election.”

Verizon, which donated $15,500 to three Senators, will also be “suspending contributions in 2021 to any member of Congress who voted in favor of objecting to the election results.”

Intel, which donated $2,500 to Cruz, told Popular Information that it “will not contribute to members of Congress who voted against certification of the Electoral College vote as we feel that action was counter to our company's values.”

General Electric, which donated $4,000 to three Senators, will also halt donations to the group, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Disney told Politico that in light of the insurrection, the company has “decided we will not make political contributions in 2021 to lawmakers who voted to reject the certification of the Electoral College votes.” Disney’s PAC donated to $2,000 to Hawley and $1,000 to Scott.

Oracle announced on Twitter that it was suspending donations to “anyone who voted against certifying the November 2020 election results.” Oracle’s PAC donated $1,000 to Cruz and $210 to Marshall.

KPMG said it "is imposing a moratorium on contributions to Members of Congress who supported objections to state certifications of the 2020 presidential election results." KPMG’s PAC donated $10,000 to Marshall and $5,000 to Lummis.

Walmart said it will suspend all PAC donations to the 147 Republicans who objected. Days prior the company told Reuters that it planned to “examine and adjust our political giving strategy.” Walmart’s PAC donated $9,000 to four Senators — $2,500 to Lummis, $2,500 to Marshall, $2,000 to Cruz, and $2,000 to Hawley.

Holland & Hart told Popular Information that"going forward" it will "not contribute to the election campaigns of any legislator who voted to object to the certification of the 2020 Presidential election." Holland & Hart’s PAC donated $5,000 to Lummis.

Southern Company told the Atlanta-Journal Constitution that it will halt political spending for lawmakers who don’t act “in a manner consistent” with “honesty, respect, fairness, integrity and the value of diversity.” Southern Company’s PAC donated $10,000 to Marshall, $5,000 to Cruz, and $5,000 to Lummis.

Universal Music Group, Warner Music Group and Sony Music Entertainment, announced that they “will be suspending indefinitely contributions to those who voted against the lawful certification of the Electoral College,” reports Digital Music News.

Exelon “will take this opportunity to conduct a thorough review of our political contributions and PAC activity,” reports The Baltimore Sun. A spokesperson told the Sun that “we will not be making contributions to lawmakers who voted to contest the outcome of the election.” Exelon’s PAC donated $2,000 to Hawley.

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) told Popular Information that it will suspend contributions to the lawmakers who objected to the results. “The attack on our US Capitol was deeply disturbing and goes against everything we stand for in our democracy. Given this moment in history, the PwC PAC has suspended all political contributions to any member of Congress who voted to object to the certification of electoral votes,” said a spokesperson. PwC’s PAC donated $10,000 to Marshall.

Comcast/NBCUniversal, the largest corporate contributor to the Republican Senators who objected to the Electoral College count, will be suspending “all…political contributions to those elected officials who voted against certification of the Electoral College votes.” According to Popular Information’s analysis, Comcast donated at least $44,500 in the 2020 election cycle to four of the eight Senators who objected to the Election. Hyde-Smith received at least $17,500 from the company.

Hallmark took an even more decisive stance. The company told Popular Information that it will be requesting refunds from the Senators it had donated to who had objected to the certification of the results, stating that these Senators’ actions do not reflect the “company’s values.” During the 2020 election cycle, Hallmark’s PAC donated $5,000 to Marshall and $3,000 to Hawley.

HALLPAC, Hallmark’s political action committee, supports elected leaders from a wide variety of viewpoints—including Democrats, Republicans and Independents. Hallmark believes the peaceful transition of power is part of the bedrock of our democratic system, and we abhor violence of any kind. The recent actions of Senators Josh Hawley and Roger Marshall do not reflect our company’s values. As a result, HALLPAC requested Sens. Hawley and Marshall to return all HALLPAC campaign contributions.

The rest of the companies that responded to Popular Information's inquiry were less definitive in their future plans. 

Still, other companies that were originally not contacted by Popular Information are beginning to issue statements in light of this reporting. Goldman Sachs told The New York Times that it was freezing donations and plans to conduct a “thorough assessment of how people acted during this period.”

In a statement to Popular Information, Dell said it “will suspend all contributions to members of Congress whose statements and activities during the post-election period are not in line with Dell’s principles.”

Nike said it "will not support any member of Congress...who voted to decertify the Electoral College results."

Walgreens said "has decided to suspend contributions to the members of Congress who voted to object to the certification of the U.S. Electoral College votes," reports Quartz.

PPG Industries said the company will "suspend all political contributions to members of Congress that who voted to object to the Electoral College certification,” according to an internal memo obtained by Popular Information.

S&P Global said it has "suspended contribution indefinitely to all member of Congress who voted against certification of the election," according to an internal memo obtained by Popular Information.

Eli Lilly said it will “suspend political giving to those who voted against certification of the 2020 election results.” The company wrote that while they support candidates from both parties, “[they] expect any candidate [they] support to demonstrate respect for people and respect for our democratic process and institutions.

BASF, Genentech, and Sanofi — three major chemical firms — are "cutting off donations to members of the Senate and House of Representatives who objected to certifying any state electoral results," reports Chemical & Engineering News.

Zillow told Vox that they will suspend contributions to those who objected to Biden’s electoral college victory.

Best Buy announced it will halt donations to those who voted against the certification, reports the Star Tribune.

American Express CEO Steve Squeri announced that the company will no longer support the Republican members who objected to the election results, according to an internal staff memo obtained by Popular Information. "Last week's attempts by some congressional members to subvert the presidential election results and disrupt the peaceful transition of power do not align with our American Express Blue Box values; therefore AXP PAC will not support them," Squeri writes.

International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) CEO Tom McGee also announced that the ICSC will be “suspending all ICSC PAC donations for the next three months,” according to an internal memo obtained by Popular Information. McGee writes that “during this historically challenging period…the focus of politicians should be on governing and uniting our nation, not campaigning and raising money.”

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce said that it will suspend contributions to certain lawmakers due to their “actions”, reports The Hill.

Cisco told The Hill that it will not donate “to any of the 147 representatives and senators who attempted to prevent Congress from fulfilling its constitutional duty to certify a legitimate and fair presidential election.”

Google announced that its PAC will “not be making any contributions this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certification of the election results.”

AllState, PG&E, Kraft Heinz, Public Service Enterprise Group, EBay, General Mills, Qurate Retail Group, AES, and Newmont Corp — all member of the Fortune 500 — told CNN they were suspending contributions to members of Congress who voted to subvert the results of the presidential election.

Companies that will pause political giving

Boston Scientific:

In light of recent events and the polarized political environment, we have chosen to temporarily suspend our PAC activity and review our approach to future contributions. As we shared earlier this week, we believe in respecting the integrity of the democratic process, the election outcome and the peaceful transition of power. We remain committed to our values—including diversity and caring—in our work to bring meaningful medical innovations to physicians and patients who need them.

Boston Scientific previously donated $7,000 to three of the eight Senators who objected — $3,000 to Marshall, $3,000 to Scott, and $1,000 to Lummis. 

Hilton:

Hilton condemns the lawlessness, violence and attack on American democracy seen at the United States Capitol last Wednesday. Due to the impact of the global pandemic, the Hilton Political Action Committee was suspended in March 2020 and remains suspended today. Historically the PAC has distributed donations equally across the two major political parties. As a direct result of recent events, Hilton will not be making political donations and will keep its PAC suspended indefinitely. We commit to any future donations being shared equally across the major parties and only after careful assessment of the recipient’s voting record.”

Hilton’s PAC donated $3,500 to Hawley.

Capital One:

"In light of recent events, Capital One will suspend contributions through our PAC while we review the program and our contributions.”

Boeing:

We continuously assess our political action committee contributions to ensure that Boeing supports those who reflect our company’s values. Boeing strongly condemns the violence, lawlessness and destruction that took place in the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Given the current environment, we are not making political contributions at this time. We will continue to carefully evaluate future contributions to ensure that we support those who not only support our company, but also uphold our country’s most fundamental principles.

Boeing has donated at least $28,500 to three of the eight Senators since 2019. On January 7, following the riots, Boeing CEO David Calhoun stated that “the vote of the people and the peaceful transition of government are core to our democracy....In the spirit of bipartisanship, we encourage [elected officials] to work with President-elect Biden to unify our nation.” 

Altria Group:

Altria strongly condemns the violence that occurred at the U.S. Capitol. January 6 was a dark day in American history, and we look forward to the peaceful transition of power that will occur on January 20.

We have a long history of supporting policy makers on both sides of the aisle because participation in the political and public policy processes is vital to our business, and serves the best interests of our shareholders, employees, trade partners and adult consumers.  We have spent the past few days discussing the right path forward and have decided, at this time, to suspend all political contributions while we re-examine our existing contribution criteria and guiding principles.

Altria’s PAC donated $10,000 to Hyde-Smith, $10,000 to Marshall, $5,000 to Cruz, $5,000 to Lummis and $2,500 to Hawley.

McDonald’s:

We have already paused all of our political giving while we review our policies and procedures. Going forward, we will ensure that all contributions continue to align with our values and the purpose of our business.

McDonald’s PAC donated $2,500 to Marshall.

Microsoft told Popular Information that its “political action committee decided last Friday that it will not make any political donations until after it assesses the implications of last week’s events.” Microsoft’s PAC donated $3,500 to Lummis, $3,500 to Marshall, and $2,500 to Hawley.

3M, which donated $1,000 to Lummis, told Popular Information that it will pause all “federal and state political expenditures for the first quarter of the year” and will reassess its policies.

Archer-Daniels-Midland, which donated $10,000 to Marshall, told Popular Information that it will pause political donations until it completes “a thorough review of all of its political donation policies.”

UnitedHealth Group, which donated $12,500 to three Senators, told Popular Information it will pause donations to federal candidates “to ensure they continue to align with our company’s values.”

American Airlines, which donated $5,000 to Cruz, also told Popular Information that it will take “a three-month pause from [political] giving to review…contribution.”

Clorox told Popular Information that it is “pausing our political contributions to ensure they align with the Company’s principles and values." Clorox’s PAC donated $2,000 to Hyde-Smith.

Safeway (Albertsons) said it has “paused our political giving, and will take time to review our strategy and assess how we might allocate future contributions.” Safeway’s PAC donated $1,000 to Scott and $567 to Hyde-Smith.

Ernst & Young told Popular Information that “[e]ffective immediately, the EY Political Action Committee (PAC) is suspending its giving.” Future giving will “be guided by our business imperatives but also align with our EY values,” said a spokesperson. Ernst & Young’s PAC donated $25,000 to three Senators — $10,000 to Marshall, $10,000 to Hawley, and $5,000 to Lummis.

PNC said it “strongly condemns the violent actions taken in an attempt to disrupt the Electoral College process in Congress” and “has suspended contributions to those members of Congress who voted against the certification of the nation’s valid Electoral College votes.” PNC’s PAC has donated $5,000 to Marshall since 2019.

Wells Fargo said it will suspend PAC donations, according to an internal memo obtained by Popular Information. “[W]e will take into consideration the actions of elected officials who objected to the electoral college vote during this critical period of democracy.” read the memo. Wells Fargo’s PAC donated $2,000 to Marshall and $1,000 to Hawley.

Accenture announced that the firm was “pausing” all PAC contributions in a company-wide webcast. Accenture’s PAC donated $5,000 to Cruz and $1,000 to Kennedy.

JetBlue Airways said it "has decided to temporarily pause all contributions to candidates," according to an email obtained by Popular Information. JetBlue’s PAC donated $3,000 to Scott and $1,000 to Cruz.

Charles Schwab, which originally suspended donations, announced on January 13 that the company was discontinuing its political action committee and “will no longer accept contributions from employees or make financial contributions to lawmakers.” The company wrote that an “apolitical position is in the best interest of our clients, employees, stockholders and the communities in which we operate.”

Facebook told Popular Information that the company is pausing all “PAC contributions for at least the current quarter” as it reviews its policies.

BlackRock will also be halting political donations, reports The Washington Post.

Visa told Popular Information that “last week the VISA PAC temporarily suspended all political donations” as it reviews its candidate contribution guidelines.

Other companies that will be pausing contributions include: United Parcel Service (which donated at least $30,500 to five of the eight Senators), the Coca-Cola Company, J.P. Morgan, H&R Block, Raytheon, Northrop Grumman, Leidos, BP, Union Pacific, Aflac, Marathon Petroleum, Novo Nordisk, Gilead Sciences, Tyson Foods, Liberty Mutual Insurance, Kroger, General Motors, Spirit Aerosystems, Occidental Petroleum, Edward Jones, Squire Patton Biggs, Baker & Hostetler, Lockheed Martin, Bloomin’ Brands, JBS, and Holland & Knight.

Companies that will take subverting the democratic process into consideration

Several companies issued statements to Popular Information that were critical of the Republicans who objected to the Electoral College vote and said their actions would play a factor in future decisions about political giving. These companies stopped short, however, of saying they would stop contributing to the Republican objectors.

Bank of America:

Our PAC contributes to both parties and takes a lot of factors into account. However in the next election cycle the PAC will review its decision making criteria in light of the actions that contributed to the appalling violent assault on the U.S. Capitol.

Bank of America’s PAC donated $5,000 to Marshall. 

Berkshire Hathaway Energy:

Thank you for your inquiry. Within our industry, we engage with a wide range of stakeholders and may not always agree with every position taken by the candidates our employee-driven political action committee supports. Any future donations to Sen. Marshall will be carefully evaluated in light of current events. We look forward to working with President-elect Biden and the new administration to continue carrying out our commitment to creating a sustainable energy future.

Berkshire Hathaway Energy’s PAC donated $2,500 to Marshall. 

Ford:

Ford condemns the violent actions that happened this week, which contradict the ideals of a free and fair election and a peaceful transition of power. Our employee PAC contributes to candidates who support policies critical to Ford’s employees, communities and jobs. Events over the past year have underscored the need for a broader, ongoing discussion about other relevant considerations.

Ford’s PAC donated $15,500 to four Senators — $7,000 to Marshall, $5,000 to Hyde-Smith, $2,500 to Lummis, and $1,000 to Hawley. 

Bayer:

The horrific images that we saw this week at the U.S. Capitol were shocking, disturbing and contrary to the very core of what it is to live in a democratic society. These are not images worthy of a great country like the United States.

At Bayer, we believe in the rule of law and the democratic process. And, as Americans, we have always been proud of the peaceful transition of power. Our strong hope is our country’s leaders can now come together calmly and peacefully across differences and do what’s right.

As a company rooted in science and innovation, Bayer’s political action committee, BayerPAC, supports policymakers that rely on facts, work in a bipartisan manner and make decisions objectively.

Bayer’s PAC donated $5,000 to Marshall.

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld told Politico that the firm will take into consideration the insurrection and the “false rhetoric questioning the legitimacy of the recent elections as part of a broad array of factors when determining our PAC giving priorities.”

Juul:

Our company, through the Juul Labs Employees Political Action Committee (JLE PAC), supports bipartisan candidates. Yet, the events of January 6th require us to reflect upon our approach to ensure it is fully consistent with our principles. To that end, last week, the company’s leadership team recommended to the JLE PAC Board of Directors that the conduct of elected officials surrounding the events of January 6th should be weighed when determining future support, and the JLE PAC Board voted to accept this recommendation.

Companies that are reviewing their political giving

Several companies told Popular Information they are reviewing the policies around their political giving or have not made any decisions.

CVS Health:

Future PAC giving is under review based on the events of the past few weeks.

CVS Health’s PAC donated $1,000 to Hawley. 

ExxonMobil:

Thanks for reaching out. We are reviewing the contributions of the PAC.

ExxonMobil’s PAC was the second largest contributor to the eight Senators. The company’s PAC donated a total of $38,625 to five Senators — $10,625 to Hyde-Smith, $10,000 to Marshall, $10,000 to Lummis, $3,000 to Kennedy, and $5,000 to Tuberville. 

FedEx:

FedEx has long supported candidates on both sides of the political aisle with the goal of promoting the interests of our organization, employees and customers. Multiple factors impact our decisions to support candidates, and we are reviewing all future political contributions. We condemn the violence that occurred in Washington, D.C., and fully support the results of the U.S. general election. We congratulate and look forward to working with the Biden administration on policy issues important to our company and our customers.

FedEx’s PAC donated $20,500 to four Senators — $10,000 to Marshall, $6,000 to Cruz, $2,500 to Lummis, and $2,000 to Hawley. 

Amgen:

The Amgen PAC makes political action committee (PAC) contributions to Members of Congress and candidates of both parties. Given that we are only a few days in to the new election cycle period, our PAC has not made any decisions on PAC allocations at this time.

Amgen’s PAC donated $7,500 to two Senators — $5,000 to Lummis and $2,500 to Marshall.

Target:

Target is fully transparent about our PAC contributions. Our TargetCitizens PAC is funded through voluntary contributions from our team members and contributes in a bipartisan manner to a wide range of federal candidates and organizations. We know that there isn’t a single candidate who aligns completely with Target or our team members on every issue, which is why we rely on established criteria like a candidate’s impact on our business, committee assignments, and more when we make contributions. Consistent with our current practice, we WILL continue to review our giving criteria and PAC contributions on an ongoing basis.

Target’s PAC donated $1,000 to Marshall. 

T-Mobile/Sprint:

The assault on the U.S. Capitol and on democracy was unacceptable. T-Mobile has supported many elected officials in a bipartisan approach to advancing a policy agenda that keeps the U.S. on the forefront of wireless technology. In light of recent events, we intend to reevaluate our PAC giving, and we look forward to working with the incoming Administration.

T-Mobile’s PAC donated $25,500 to seven Senators — $8,000 to Marshall, $4,500 to Cruz, $3,500 to Scott, $3,500 to Hyde-Smith, $3,000 to Kennedy, $2,000 to Lummis, and $1,000 to Hawley. Sprint’s PAC donated $6,000 to three Senators — $3,000 to Marshall, $2,000 to Hawley, and $1,000 to Cruz.

Delta:

Previous contributions do not mean DeltaPAC will contribute to a candidate in the future. Our PAC has robust processes for reviewing candidates before every contribution to ensure they align with both Delta’s position on priority aviation and business issues, and importantly, our values.

Delta’s PAC donated $22,500 to four Senators — $10,000 to Cruz, $5,000 to Lummis, $5,000 to Marshall, and $2,500 to Kennedy.

Procter & Gamble:

Free and fair elections are the foundation of our democracy and must be protected and respected. We will take into account any failure to do so when determining future support. Our previous decisions on contributions do not dictate choices going forward.

Procter & Gamble’s PAC donated $3,500 to Hawley.

Truist:

We’re carefully reviewing our political engagement practices to assure that Truist supports candidates who exclusively advance unity and democracy

SunTrust’s PAC donated $1,000 to Marshall and $1,000 to Kennedy.

Toyota:

Given recent events and the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, we are assessing our future PAC criteria.

Toyota’s PAC donated $24,000 to five Senators — $10,000 to Hyde-Smith, $10,000 to Cruz, $2,000 to Hawley, $1,000 to Marshall, and $1,000 to Tuberville.

United Airlines:

As with every new Congress, the United Airlines PAC evaluates political contribution priorities for the coming cycle and that review is currently ongoing. These evaluations include looking at those who align with both our business interests and our company values, and the recent events in Washington will also be included in the decision making process.

United Airlines’ PAC donated $2,000 to Cruz.

Koch Industries told the Wichita Business Journal that it “will continue to evaluate, among other criteria, the civility of candidates in deciding whom to support.” Koch donated $20,000 to Marshall, $10,000 to Lummis, and $5,000 to Tuberville.

Chevron told the Wall Street Journal that it will be reviewing its political giving. “The events of the past week will be a part of our review process,” said the company. Chevron’s PAC donated $10,000 to Lummis, $10,000 to Hyde-Smith, and $5,000 to Marshall.

Home Depot told the Atlanta-Journal Constitution that it has not made any decisions on the next election cycle, but will “will evaluate future donations against a number of factors.” Home Depot’s PAC donated $10,000 to Hawley, $5,000 to Tuberville, and $5,000 to Marshall.

Cox Enterprises told the Atlanta-Journal Constitution that it will be “revisiting our contribution policies and will take into consideration efforts to disregard the votes of our customers and employees…[I]n light of these recent events we will be scrutinizing more vigilantly whom we support going forward.” Cox’s PAC donated $5,000 to Marshall.

Lowe’s told WSOC-TV it will review its political giving and “will continue to rely on our established criteria and the actions of those we consider supporting.” Lowe’s PAC donated $4,000 to Marshall and $1,000 to Lummis.

Companies that responded but declined to comment 

Hogan Lovells and New York Life responded to Popular Information's inquiry but declined to comment. 

Companies that did not respond 

Of the 144 corporations Popular Information contacted, 46 did not respond.

Major corporate contributors that did not respond include Lockheed Martin which donated at least $30,500 to five of the eight Senators.

The following companies did not respond:

Abbott Laboratories, Ally Financial, Alston & Bird, AMC Theatres, Anthem, Bacardi, Burger King, Caterpillar, Charter Communications, CSX Corporation, Deere & Company, DLA Piper LLP, Enterprise Holdings, Fox Corporation, General Dynamics, Glaxosmithkline, Glover Park Group, Greenberg Traurig, Halliburton, Hartford Financial Services Group, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Honeywell, iHeartmedia, Invesco Holding, K&L Gates, McguireWoods, Merck & Co., Metlife, Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Americas, Motorola Solutions, Murphy Oil, Nestle Purina Petcare, NetJets, News Corporation, Norfolk Southern, Northwestern Mutual, Philips North America, Phillips 66, Publix Super Markets, Reynolds American, Rolls-Royce, Samsung Electronics, Sidley Austin, Sierra Nevada Corporation, Southwest Airlines, and Teva Pharmaceuticals

UPDATE (1/19, 12:00 PM): This piece was updated with a statement from Boeing, Bayer, Citi Bank, T-Mobile/Sprint, J.P. Morgan & Chase, Walmart, Dow Inc, Mastercard, Hallmark, AT&T, 3M, Delta, Charles Schwab, Microsoft, Hilton, ICSC, Airbnb, Deloitte, Procter & Gamble, Intel, Verizon, Truist and American Express.